Discovering Heritage Joe Fisher header image and quote

A Real Diamond Geezer

The son of  Jacques Fisher and Sybil Jacobs Joe was born in 1922 in Newcastle.  He spent most of his years as a resident of Jesmond and Gosforth.   His father was a director of the family wholesale jewellery business in Newcastle. Between 1930 and 1936 Joe attended  the Royal Grammar School in Newcastle for his secondary education. Joe still lives in Gosforth now at the age of 98.

The Laidlaw Family of Brush Makers

David Wardell follows the Laidlaw family through the rise and fall of fortunes, times of tension when their land was taken for rail improvements at Manors and various business exploits as one would expect over such a long term. The story is accompanied by numerous news snippets which illuminate particular instances of the lives of individual family members which were deemed to be news worthy and set in print for us all to read.

My Scottish Townhouse Story Portrait a3 poster ©Discovering Heritage

My Scottish Townhouse Story

Do you hold your Scottish heritage close to your heart? My Scottish Townhouse Story offers a unique way to add an extraordinary hallmark to your house. Our specialist archival research displayed with an elegantly designed illustration of your property offers a link to history that allows you to travel back through the years and view your house alongside the residents of yesteryear. Discovering Heritage House Historians

Discovering Heritage header of Gosforth Central Hall 1949

Memories of Gosforth High Street! (part 4)

Sit back and enjoy a wonderful walk along 1950’s Gosforth High Street!
Discovering Heritage are a team of specialist historical researchers with expertise in researching local history and residential history. As part of our community outreach we share some of our research through this blog.

Gosforth High Street Old Tramway Buuilding Discovering Heritrage

Memories of Gosforth High Street 1950 onwards (Part 3)

This was Andersons, a general dealer and grocer. Here we could get a ‘cheap’ ice lolly after the cinema if money permitted for about 2d or 3d. These were called Jubblies, a watery orange ice lolly shaped like a pyramid about 3 – 4 inches in size and without a stick in a waxed cardboard covering. Tearing off one corner, you could squeeze the pyramid of ice up gradually as you enjoyed it. As you sucked away at it, the juice came out, leaving behind more of a pyramid of plain ice than a fruit lolly. They’re still available today for home freezing, but they are now only half their former size. 

Jesmond Cemetery Discovering Heritage

The Remarkable Life of One Gosforth Woman

One of history’s dilemmas is that it tends to favor the well known, the grand gesture, the highly profiled. However, I find myself gripped with the idea that every man, woman and child who lives or has lived has or had their own story, and all small ordinary stories will influence the bigger stories in history. Every occupation enables a community to thrive; simply by going about their day-to-day lives, our ancestors played a part in creating history